The problem with blue carbon: can seagrass be replanted … by hand?

The problem with blue carbon: can seagrass be replanted … by hand?

The planet’s incredible marine carbon sink is vanishing – and the only way to replace it is costly, labour-intense and takes years. Experts say it’s worth it

Blue carbon: the hidden CO2 sink that pioneers say could save the planet

Inside a wooden boathouse on the shore of Loch Craignish, a mass of fronds sit in two 1,000-litre tanks. The fronds are seagrass, and they are filled with seeds. Next to the tanks is a Heath Robinson-style series of pumps. The laboratory may be low-tech, but it is the headquarters of a pioneering, community-led climate experiment.

The goal is to restore the loch’s once-thriving seagrass meadows. “We are trying to create a seismic change in the health of this sea loch,” says Danny Renton, of Craignish Restoration of Marine & Coastal Habitats (Cromach) and founder of Seawilding, a charity backed by people living in the surrounding villages in Argyll and Bute, about three hours’ drive from the Cop26 summit in Glasgow.

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